Inside Morrisons £15 school meals box that includes five breakfasts and lunches for kids

MORRISONS has rolled out thousands more of its weekly £15 school meals boxes.

The supermarket has been sending the boxes for free to families whose kids would normally be eligible for free school meals since November.

The maximum number of boxes Morrisons could previously deliver was around 2,500 per week.

But now the supermarket is able to deliver tens of thousands of packages per week after increasing capacity. 

Morrisons says its boxes provide at least £15 worth of food, which is enough food for one child to have five breakfasts and five lunches.

It also doesn't charge for delivery.

What’s in the box?

PARENTS will receive 20 items in their delivery, which Morrisons says is enough food to feed your child five breakfasts and five lunches.

The supermarket says the parcels have been developed in partnership with Morrisons nutritionist to ensure the items included are nutritious. 

So what’s on the menu? Here’s the full list of items you will receive.

If Morrisons is unable to pack one of the items below, you’ll get another comparable item of similar value.

We’ve also looked on Morrisons website to see what the price of each item is.

For items we were unable to find, we found a comparable product with a similar or higher price:

  • Wholemeal Bread (800g): Morrisons’ own loaf costs 49p
  • Morrisons Royal Gala Apples (6 pack): £1.49
  • Morrisons Bananas (5 pack): 79p
  • Morrisons Cucumber: 50p
  • Morrisons Baking Potatoes (4 pack): 50p
  • Morrisons Mixed Peppers (3 pack): £1.15
  • Sweetcorn in Water (198g): Morrisons’ own can costs 60p
  • Morrisons Mighty Malties Cereal (625g): Currently it’s 79p if you order by January 31, otherwise it’s £1
  • Savers Tuna Chunks (145g) x 2: These are 63p each, which means you’ll get £1.26 worth of tuna
  • Morrisons Cherry & Berry No Added Sugar Squash Double Concentrate (1.5L): 99p
  • Morrisons Long Life British Semi Skimmed Milk (1L): 90p
  • Fusilli Pasta (500g): Morrisons’ own brand costs 60p
  • Heinz Mayo Sachets x 2: 5p each (not available online)
  • Morrisons Passata with Basil (390g): Morrisons says it no longer stocks this item on its website, so you could be getting this Napolina passata with basil which costs £1 instead. In store it costs 65p.
  • Delifrance Petit Pains (4 pack): Morrisons says it no longer stocking this item on its website, so you could be getting a six pack of Morrisons Bake at Home Petit Pains for 84p instead. It is £1 in-store.
  • Morrisons Simmer Sauce Cheese Mix (30g): 25p
  • Morrisons Baked Beans (410g): 30p
  • Soreen Lunchbox Loaves (5 pack): Currently it’s £1 if you order by January 24 online, otherwise it’s £1.40
  • Morrisons Red Kidney Beans (400g): 50p
  • Morrisons Sweet Clems: £1.65

The price you would pay if ordering the items online adds upto £15.60, while in-store it currently comes to a total of £15.34.

The Sun checked the prices and if buying the items online or in-store from Morrisons they would add up to more than £15 worth of food.

Customers should still compare prices with rivals before buying.

Staple items including wholemeal bread, apples, milk, and baked beans are included in the package.

Schools are currently shut due to the coronavirus pandemic, but the government has a school meals scheme in place so low income families can still get free food for their kids.

Under the scheme, free food packages and vouchers have been sent out to families.

The Morrisons food packages are one of the options under the government's scheme and schools in England can claim back the costs.

Your child will be able to receive the box if their school has signed up to the Morrisons School Doorstep Deliveries scheme.

The boxes will then be delivered by DPD free of charge to your door.

Boxes are delivered Monday to Friday and if they are ordered before 10am, they will be delivered the next working day. 

Your child’s school will provide your address and contact details so that Morrisons can deliver the package.

Parents will be provided with tracking information for their box by DPD.

Morrisons' scheme has been backed by footballer Marcus Rashford, who has spearheaded the drive to get kids free school meals.

He said Morrions has “acted by example” in providing free school meals to children and has helped kids “receive the substance and nutrition that they require and deserve during what is a difficult time for all”. 

He added: “A big thank you to all involved."

It comes following national outrage that ensued earlier this month over free school meals.

How can I apply for free school meal vouchers?

HOW you claim the free school meals depends on where you live.

For example, you can either get a form to fill in from your school, call your local council or fill in an online form.

Start by entering your postcode into the Gov.uk website to see what the process is in your area.

There’s a different process if you live in Northern Ireland, Scotland, or Wales.

It's worth pointing out that if you claim housing benefit or council tax support you can apply for free school meals when you are filling out your forms.

Families posted photos to social media of meagre food parcels sent out by school meals supplier Chartwells.

Following the backlash, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson slammed the packages to be a “scandal and disgrace”.

Following this, a fresh row broke out over schools being told not to provide meal vouchers to families during the February half-term.

The Department of Education said that schools do not need to dole out the vouchers to kids – and parents will have to apply to the £170million Winter Grant Scheme instead.

Marks and Spencer has boosted free school meal vouchers spent in store by £5, so parents will be able to get £20 worth of food in total.

Want to know how to apply for free school meals during lockdown? We have all the details in this guide.

And after a disastrous week for free school meals, The Sun shows you how you can feed your kids ten lunches for less than £30 – and they certainly won’t go hungry.

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