BBC Weather: Carol Kirkwood warns UK heatwave at risk as Atlantic cold front sweeps in

BBC Weather’s Carol Kirkwood said Britons shouldn’t expect the temperatures to match the feel of the air as strong winds will make it feel much cooler across the UK. Scotland, Northern Ireland and northwest England are most at risk of rain in the next coming days. But by Friday, isobars are expected to drag in continental air bringing highs of 32C this weekend.

Ms Kirkwood said: “It’s a windy day. Strong to gale force winds around Orkney but for the rest of us not that strong but still noticeable and breezy across southern areas.

“Low pressure yesterday is starting to pull away to the northeast so that’s where we’ve got the rain this morning and the strongest winds.

“We’ve also got a lot of showers coming in across western areas especially Scotland, Northern Ireland and northwest England but because of the strength of the wind some of those will make it across to the east and southeast.

“Temperature-wise we are looking at highs into the low 20s but these will be tempered by the strong winds and it will feel a bit cooler.

“Throughout the night the winds will ease a touch in the north but there will still be a few showers.

“A transient ridge of high pressure is building on Wednesday but there is a weather front waiting in the wings.

“We will start off with some sunshine in England and Wales but as the weatherfront approaches from the west, the cloud will build turning the sunshine hazy.

“While Scotland and north England will start on a cloudy note and end up with sunshine.”

It comes as researchers say it is currently impossible to know whether more people contract coronavirus in hot or cold weather.

The arrival of summer in the Northern hemisphere has drawn attention to the question of whether warmer weather might slow the spread of COVID-19.

But new analysis from researchers at the University of Oxford highlights key limitations of available data.

Dr Francois Cohen, study lead author and senior researcher at Oxford’s Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment, said: “Our study found several problems with trying to understand the influence of weather using existing data on confirmed COVID-19 cases.

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“The existing data can’t reliably tell us whether warmer weather slows down the spread of COVID-19, as some earlier studies have tried to assess, so we urge both policy makers and the public to act with caution.”

The analysis, published in the Environmental and Resource Economics journal, says there are a number of potential problems with the data.

The main issue, according to the study, is that the weather itself could be influencing the number of tests carried out and who gets tested.

For example, patients suffering from pre-existing diseases could develop COVID-19 unrelated symptoms due to the prevailing weather conditions and hence be selected for COVID-19 testing more frequently than other population groups.

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