'Boris talks a lot': Lindsay Hoyle poses with pet PARROT named for PM

‘Boris talks a lot’: Speaker Lindsay Hoyle poses with his PARROT named after the PM (who also makes an appearance as a DOG TOY) and reveals Labour leader Starmer could be next to join his parliamentary menagerie, saying ‘it would be nice to have a Keir’

Boris ‘talks a lot’ and has ‘ruffled feathers’, the Commons Speaker revealed today in an indiscreet assessment of … his pet parrot.

Sir Lindsay Hoyle allowed the public a peek into his home life with the colourful flyer named after the Prime Minister, as he posed with his menagerie in his Parliamentary apartment.

The animal-loving Chorley MP also showed off ‘posh cat’ Patrick the Maine Coon for the interview with the Spanish EFE agency.

He and wife Catherine also own tortoise Maggie, rottweiler Gordon and terrier Betty, who are all also named after political heavyweights.

And although the dogs were not on display, their presence was obvious from an extraordinary prop shown off by the Speaker.

As he held Boris while sitting on a sofa he had in his lap a £17.99 Boris Johnson dog toy. 

 Sir Lindsay Hoyle allowed the public a peek into his home life with the colourful flyer named after the Prime Minister, as he posed with his menagerie in his Parliamentary apartment.

 

Although the dogs were not on display, their presence was obvious from an extraordinary prop shown off by the Speaker. As he held Boris while sitting on a sofa he had in his lap a £17.99 Boris Johnson dog chew

The animal-loving Chorley MP also showed off ‘posh cat’ Patrick the Maine Coon for the interview with the Spanish EFE agency

Lighthearted Commons gatekeeper 

Sir Lindsay was first elected to Parliament in 1997 and previously ran a textiles and printing business. 

 He was  previous Speaker John Bercow’s most senior deputy – known by the formal title ‘chairman of ways and means’ and was an immediate favourite for the role of Commons referee when Mr Bercow – with whom he had a strained relationship – announced he was stepping down after 10 years in the chair.

Born in Adlington in Lancashire, where he still lives, he was elected for Labour on Chorley Borough Council where he became deputy leader and mayor during his near two-decade tenure.

Selected for the Chorley constituency, he won back the seat for the party after it had been in Tory hands for 18 years.

The son of MP Doug Hoyle, his cricket-addict father gave him his unconventional name after being particularly impressed with the showing of an Australian batsman during the Ashes tour of 1948.

There was heartbreak for the twice-married politician and his family when his daughter, Natalie Lewis-Hoyle, was found dead in her bedroom just before Christmas 2017.

Sir Lindsay said he was ‘truly devastated’ at the 28-year-old’s tragic passing.

During the campaign to be the 158th Speaker, the 63-year-old said Parliament had a drinks and drugs problem and said MPs were telling him they can no longer stand for re-election as their family has to come first.

‘They are part of the family. I don’t think Patrick would forgive me if I said ‘you’re not coming to London’, and the same with Boris — he thinks he belongs in London’, Sir Lindsay told Ese.

In July Sir Lindsay revealed Boris has taken to squawking ‘order order’ and ‘lock the doors’ on the London to Lancashire train. 

He told The Times: ‘I’ll put the parrot down and he’ll start shouting things like ‘llock the doors. Lock the doorsl’ and people on the train start looking around saying who is shouting lock the doors?’  

‘Posh’ Patrick is named for conservative Lord Patrick Cormack.

The late cat Dennis paid tribute to veteran MP Dennis Skinner and the 57-pound Rottweiler Gordon was named in honor of former Labour prime minister Gordon Brown.

Betty the dog ‘is tenacious and lets nothing go by’ just like the only female Speaker of the Commons Betty Boothroyd.

And Maggie the tortoise was named for Margaret Thatcher, because of her ‘hard shell’ and the fact that she, too, is ‘not for turning’. 

The Speaker, who was a Labour MP before taking on the politically neutral Speaker’s job last November, also suggested he would be open to increasing his politically themed pet family.

Asked whether his next pet could be called Jeremy or Keir in reference to former Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn and his replacement, the more centrist Sir Keir Starmer, Sir Lindsay said: ‘It depends on the character of the animal. But I think it would be nice to have a Keir.’

Since taking up the position, Hoyle, a man with a reputation for being fair and affable, has transformed how the lower house functions, facilitating remote connections for MPs during the pandemic and for the first time in centuries using digital instead of manual, in-person voting, an approach that has remained largely unchanged since the 14th century.

The House of Commons did not escape the polarizing effects of Brexit, which fed a systemic culture of workplace bullying. Hoyle’s priority was to address this.

“Brexit took a big toll on MPs. The anger, the hatred, the division amongst families. That had a real impact on people,” he said, adding that MPs and parliamentary staff alike had to endure the atmosphere on a daily basis.

Sir Lindsay Hoyle, who took over as speaker from John Bercow in November, drives or takes the train up to his constituency in Chorley, North west England, every week with his wife Catherine and their animals (pictured)

‘Posh’ Patrick is named for conservative Lord Patrick Cormack

The Speaker, who was a Labour MP before taking on the politically neutral Speaker’s job last November, also suggested he would be open to increasing his politically themed pet family

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