City-dwellers working from home can be left feeling lonely, study says

City-dwellers who work from home can be left feeling lonely and glum, new analysis suggests

  • City-dwellers working from home were less happy compared to those travelling to work or working away from their homes, survey finds
  • But the WFH effect on happiness did not apply to those living in countryside
  • Happiness levels across England and Wales averaged 7.2 but in London it is 6.5 

Working from home can make you glum – especially if you’re alone in a city, official analysis claims.

A survey of the country’s well-being found that city-dwellers working from home were less happy compared with those travelling to work or working away from their homes.

However the WFH effect on happiness did not apply to those living in the countryside, the Office for National Statistics study found.

Working from home can make you glum – especially if you’re alone in a city, official analysis claims (file photo)

The data was drawn from regular ONS well-being surveys carried out in England and Wales during the first three months of this year.

Yesterday’s report said that across England and Wales happiness levels averaged 7.2 out of 10. But in London the score dropped to 6.5.

It said loneliness is the main reason why happiness dips, and in London nearly three in ten said they were lonely at least some of the time.

‘Adults in urban areas including London who had worked from home over the last seven days were more likely to report lower levels of happiness than those who had not worked from home,’ the survey said.

‘Overall, these results indicate that whether someone works from home or not does have an impact on people’s happiness in urban areas – but not in rural areas.’

Yesterday’s report said that across England and Wales happiness levels averaged 7.2 out of 10. But in London the score dropped to 6.5 (file photo)

The happiest people were the over-75s, the ONS said, while lockdown appeared to be having the greatest negative impact on the pleasure of those in their 30s and early 40s.

It comes at a time when there has been no word from ministers on when the Government’s advice that everyone who can work from home should do so will be eased.

While many have assumed that there will be a mass back-to-the office movement if the final removal of Covid rules goes ahead on 21 June, there remain doubts about what restrictions may remain.

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