Journal to require researchers to see how findings create gender bias

Now Nature goes woke! Top science journal forces writers to consider ‘sex and gender’ in studies, justify why if they don’t and investigate how their work ‘perpetuates gender stereotypes’

  • Nature has required its researchers to look into how their findings ‘might perpetuate gender stereotypes’ before publishing their results
  • The guidance also requires staffers to provide details on how ‘sex and gender’ were taken into account for each individual study
  • The rule seeks to erase bias by studies that ‘don’t account for sex and gender’
  • Researchers will have to also provide proof of ‘ informed consent’ before sharing data concerning a person’s sex or gender, officials write 

A top academic journal has required its researchers to detail how ‘sex and gender’ were taken into account for each of their individual studies.

The guidance, put into effect by top brass at Nature last week, also demands personnel look into how their findings ‘might perpetuate gender stereotypes’ before publishing any results, officials announced last week.

‘From now on, researchers who submit papers to a subset of Nature Portfolio journals will be prompted to state whether and how sex and gender were considered in their study design,’ bosses at the prestigious British journal wrote in a post announcing the policy last week.


Top academic journal Nature has implemented  a new policy that requires its researchers to detail how ‘sex and gender’ were taken into account for each of their individual studies. The journal, headed by British geneticist Magdalena Skipper, has previously come under fire for failing to adhere to the woke left

The guidance, put into effect by brass at the scientific journal last week, demands personnel look into how their findings ‘might perpetuate gender stereotypes’ before publishing any results, officials said last week in an op-ed piece announcing the change

The post, an op-ed piece titled ‘Nature Journals Raise the Bar on Sex and Gender Reporting in Research,’ further asks scientists and clinicians conducting studies ‘to indicate that no sex and gender analyses were carried out, and clarify why.’

According to officials at the 153-year-old publication – which has long published tomes bearing medical and scientific significance – the rule seeks to erase the bias created by research studies that ‘don’t account for sex and gender.’

The announcement also saw organizers demand researchers ‘note in the title and/or abstract if findings apply to only one sex or gender,’ using the terms ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ separately – the former referring to biological sex and the latter describing the gender one identifies with. 

 The announcement also saw organizers demand researchers ‘ note in the title and/or abstract if findings apply to only one sex or gender,’ using the terms ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ separately – the former referring to biological sex and the latter describing the gender one identifies with.

The post, an op-ed piece titled ‘Nature Journals Raise the Bar on Sex and Gender Reporting in Research,’ further asks scientists and clinicians conducting studies ‘to indicate that no sex and gender analyses were carried out, and clarify why’

The changes will for the mostly apply to studies that analyze human participants, staffers at the journal said, but it will also cover studies that offer data on animals – and even cells.

According to officials at the 153-year-old publication – which has long published tomes bearing medical and scientific significance – the rule seeks to erase the bias created by research studies that ‘don’t account for sex and gender’

‘The changes apply to studies with human participants, on other vertebrates or on cell lines, in which sex and gender is an appropriate consideration,’ staffers wrote.

Cell lines refer to cultures taken from a single human or animal cell. The samples, which effectively serve as clones of the original cell, are then used for testing, since testing on a live human’s or animal’s cell is considered inhumane.

Researchers will have to also provide proof of ‘informed consent’ before sharing data concerning a person’s sex or gender, officials write.

The academics will further be required to categorize data pertaining to sex and gender, and clearly differentiate the two sample sets.

‘The aim here is to improve understanding of the degree to which sex and gender reporting is already part of study design, data collection and analysis in the research these journals publish,’ brass at the journal wrote of the new policy.

‘The journals will also evaluate author and reviewer reception of the changes so that we can iterate on them as we learn through experience.’

The company says that starting in June, four of its journals – Nature Cancer, Nature Communications, Nature Medicine, and Nature Metabolism – will advertise the policy to raise awareness over the lack of representation sex and gender in other academic journals, whom they said have failed ‘to account for sex and gender in their studies.

Staffers wrote: ‘By introducing these changes, we aim to promote transparency in study design and, ultimately, make findings more accurate. Over time, we hope to see integration of sex and gender analysis in study design by default.’

Since then, 21-year Nature veteran Skipper, 53, has shown a desire to ‘transform’ academia by utilizing more ‘social sciences’

The journal, headed by British geneticist Magdalena Skipper, has previously come under fire for failing to adhere to the woke left.

In April 2020, during the early days of the pandemic, the paper came under fire for referring to the coronavirus as a Chinese illness in one of their journals, despite it once common practice to link viral diseases with their area of outbreak.  

After facing swift public outcry and accusations of racism, Nature admitted ‘an error on our part’ for being part of press coverage that called the virus Chinese.

Since then, 21-year Nature veteran Skipper, 53, has shown a desire to ‘transform’ academia by utilizing more ‘social sciences.’

Nature did not immediately respond to DailyMail.com’s request for comment regarding the new policy Monday.   

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