Police officer, 37, pleads guilty to spying for organised crime gang

Police officer, 37, who tried to save victims in Manchester Arena terror attack led double life as underworld mole spying for organised crime gang

  • PC Mohammed Malik, 37, led a double life as an underworld mole in police force 
  • Liverpool Crown Court heard that his ‘unblemished reputation’ helped him  
  • He spent a year helping organised crime group in exchange for cash 

A police officer who tried to save victims in the Manchester Arena terror attack while off duty has been jailed after pleading guilty to spying for an organised crime group.

PC Mohammed Malik, 37, from Rochdale, led a double life as an underworld mole while working for Greater Manchester Police. 

Liverpool Crown Court heard that his ‘unblemished reputation’ masked his entanglement in a dark web of serious organised crime.  

He joined the force in 2009 and during his time as a police officer earned many commendations for tackling drug dealing in Manchester city centre. 

And in May 2017 he found himself at the centre of the Manchester Arena bombing while walking back to his car after work.  

He attempted to rush to the aid of the victims, but claimed witnesses accused him of being involved in the terror attack because of his ‘skin colour and that he had a rucksack with him’.

The comments prevented Malik from entering the arena to help with casualties, though he remained outside to help. 

However Malik has been jailed for two years and four months after pleading guilty to sending police information to an organised crime group in exchange for money.  

PC Mohammed Malik (pictured), 37, from Rochdale, led a double life as an underworld mole while working for Greater Manchester Police

In January 2017 he met an old colleague from a previous job, Mohammed Anis, 35, and the pair embarked on an ‘unhealthy relationship’ which lasted for more than a year until they were arrested in November 2018.   

Anis would ask Malik to search for both people and cars on the Greater Manchester Police internal systems, helping Anis in his business of providing cars for serious and organised crime groups.

Anis would use Snapchat and WhatsApp to send images of cars and names of individuals he wanted Malik to look for.

Malik would frequently promise to ‘check next time he was in’, searching GMP’s intelligence database to find out if police officers were monitoring cars being used by organised crime group (OCG) members, or if there was any information known to police about Anis and his associates.

After the searches, the serving police officer would send these details back to Anis, again via calls, Snapchat and WhatsApp.

Anis would then pay hundred of pounds to Malik for providing the results on a monthly basis, with investigators finding up to £600-worth of payments in bank transfers, with potentially more in cash that could never be traced, heard the court. 

In January 2017 he met an old colleague from a previous job, Mohammed Anis (pictured), 35, and the pair embarked on an ‘unhealthy relationship’ which lasted for more than a year until they were arrested in November 2018

The ‘transactional relationship’ only escalated as it went on, with Malik providing help to Anis on how to keep one step ahead of police, telling him ‘bro stop driving flashy cars, don’t give them a reason to pull you over’, and ‘no more private reg which turns heads’. 

And when attention grew into Anis’ activities, Malik told him on WhatsApp ‘don’t do business for a bit’, adding that he should ‘set up [business] under someone else, but not straight away’, it would later emerge in court. 

Malik also searched a Seat Leon in the GMP system after it was recovered by police with a bullet hole in its bumper, before threatening to withdraw his services when Anis was not paying up on time.

Eventually, the conspiracy spiralled to the point where Malik tipped off Anis that police were outside his house in Bury – and helped Anis to make a false report about a burglary at the address in order to claim insurance money.

Anis would ask Malik to search for both people and cars on the Greater Manchester Police internal systems, helping Anis in his business of providing cars for serious and organised crime groups

He would use Snapchat and WhatsApp to send images of cars and names of individuals he wanted Malik to look for

Anis was finally caught when he collected just shy of a kilo of cannabis, stashed in Asda carrier bags, from another man in Higher Broughton, Salford.

Minutes later police pulled his car over and discovered the bags in the boot – stuffed with drugs worth as much as £7,500.

Anis was arrested and, along with his inside man Malik, was charged with three counts of conspiracy to commit misconduct in a public office.

Malik pleaded guilty early on but, in the face of what a judge would later describe as ‘frankly, utterly overwhelming evidence’, Anis denied it, before being found guilty in a trial at the end of May.

Until then Malik, of Rochdale, had no previous convictions. Anis, who admitted possessing cannabis with intent to supply, had only a caution on his criminal record.

Both Malik and Anis were jailed at a hearing last month. Malik was sentenced to two years and four months in prison, while Anis was sentenced to three years and ten months. 

And when attention grew into Anis’ activities, Malik told him on WhatsApp ‘don’t do business for a bit’, adding that he should ‘set up [business] under someone else, but not straight away’, it would later emerge in court

Malik also searched a Seat Leon in the GMP system after it was recovered by police with a bullet hole in its bumper, before threatening to withdraw his services when Anis was not paying up on time

Sentencing, Judge Andrew Menary QC told the disgraced officer he had undermined public trust in the police, adding: ‘For a period of about 12 months from February 2017 and January 2018 you were involved in a corrupt relationship with your friend Mohammed Anis.

‘At times throughout this period you were each involved in the dishonest exchange of information and intelligence for money. 

‘Having a friendly police officer who could supply inside information was a potentially very useful resource.

‘It allowed criminals or those supporting criminal activity to be forewarned of police interest in them and their illegal activities or simply to know what the police knew about them and their activities.’

Detective Superintendent Steve Keeley, of GMP’s Anti-Corruption Unit, said: ‘At GMP we expect the highest standards from all of our officers as part of their duty to serve the public, and it’s clear here that Malik failed to do this and is rightly being punished for his crimes.

‘This is a good result that sends a strong message to anyone involved in corruption that we will investigate and will pursue prosecutions to bring those responsible to account.’ 

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